NYS Workers Comp Code 8832 Physician and Clerical

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NYS Workers Comp Rate for Code 8832 Physician and Clerical 

Description: Code 8832 applies to medical providers that operate in a typical doctor’s office environment. This includes physicians, dentists, other employees providing medical services, maintenance personnel engaged exclusively in cleaning or maintaining the portion of the premises used for professional purposes and clerical office employees. This Code includes employees of a physician’s office that is located in a hospital, who are employed by the physician and not employed by the hospital. Ophthalmologists and optometrists are included in Code 8832 as long as they only provide eye examinations in a typical doctor’s office environment. Also included are speech therapy, physical therapy, weight control service, and other medical or physical service-type tasks in their offices.

Pricing: Solid companies with a good loss history can obtain better than average pricing on NYS Workers compensation rates.

PHYSICIANS
Category: Health Care Providers

SIC CODE: 8011 Offices and Clinics of Doctors of Medicine

NAICS CODE: 621111 Offices of Physicians (except Mental Health Specialists)

Suggested ISO General Liability Code: 66561

Suggested Workers Compensation Code: 8832

Description of operations: Doctors and physicians are educated and licensed to deal with the overall physical health of their patients. Some are general practitioners, working with patients of all ages on routine health matters such as preventive medicine. These often act as primary care doctors who pre-screen patients according to their symptoms, prescribe medication for common ailments, and refer patients in need of more focused medical attention to specialists. Doctors may have advanced education and training in a particular medical field, such as cardiology, gastroenterology, or neurology. While most doctors work from their own private offices, some are employed by hospitals or clinics.

Property exposure is moderate due to the use of expensive diagnostic and medical equipment. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating, and air conditioning systems, and overheating of equipment. All electrical wiring must be up to code and equipment properly maintained. A small fire which produces smoke can cause considerable damage when sterile equipment and environments are compromised. If pharmaceuticals are kept on premises, theft is a concern. These items should be inaccessible for unauthorized use and stored in a protected area after hours. Most property items are better covered on inland marine forms such as a computer form or the physicians and surgeons floater. The business income and extra expense exposure can be minimized if the doctor has arranged for temporary facilities with another doctor.

Equipment breakdown exposures may be high if operations are dependent on expensive medical equipment being available on the premises, particularly if the doctor specializes in a particular field. All equipment should be maintained on an ongoing basis.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty of both money and inventory, including pharmaceuticals. The potential for theft, directly or by means of identity theft, is great. Background checks should be conducted on all employees handling money. Rigid controls must be maintained including inventory control and limited access to storage areas. All ordering, billing, and disbursement must be handled by separate individuals. Money and securities are a concern if payments are accepted on premises. Deposits should be made regularly and money should not be kept on premises overnight.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable if the physician bills for services, computers, physicians and surgeons equipment floater (which can include all office furnishings), and valuable papers and records for patients’ and suppliers’ information. Computers are used for patients’ records and other office purposes, but some medical equipment, such as video equipment and X-ray machines, is now also computerized. Physicians and surgeons floater includes items that the doctor may take off site to handle emergencies. Duplicates of all records and programs should be kept off site.

Premises liability exposure is moderate due to patients’ access to the premises. To prevent slips, trips, or falls, all areas accessible to patients must be well maintained with floor covering in good condition. The number of exits must be sufficient, and be well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure. Steps should have handrails, be illuminated, marked, and in good repair. Parking lots should be maintained free of ice and snow. Housekeeping should be excellent with spills cleaned up promptly. If surgery is performed, the area must be kept sterile at all times and carefully controlled. The patients’ area must be designed for patients who are physically impaired following the surgery. Escort procedures must be clear for all personnel. Maintaining a patient’s privacy is critical. Examination rooms, check-in and checkout stations must be in private areas so one patient cannot view information or overhear conversations regarding another patient’s confidential information.

Professional exposures are extensive. The exposure increases if the provider fails to conduct thorough background checks to verify employees’ credentials, education, and licensing. The more types of procedures that the doctor performs, the more chance of professional loss. A patient’s medical history must be checked prior to prescribing medications. Very serious losses may result from failure to secure patient approval before performing procedures, including vaccinations. Training and safety equipment should be in place to prevent exposure to radiation when performing X-rays. Needles and other equipment must be sterilized and sanitized to prevent the spread of blood-borne infectious diseases such as hepatitis, HIV, and AIDS. On-site surgery must be closely monitored, with an experienced trained individual administering and monitoring the use of the anesthetic. Finally, inappropriate touching and sexual misconduct must be considered.

Automobile exposure is generally limited to hired and nonownership liability for employees running errands. If there are owned vehicles, all drivers should be licensed with acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and records kept in a central location.

Workers compensation exposure is due to the possible transmission of disease from a patient. Gloves and masks should be worn at all times when working around bodily fluids. Employees should have access to vaccinations to prevent diseases. Unruly or unpredictable patients can cause harm including strains, back injuries, and contusions. Training and safety equipment should be in place to prevent exposure to radiation when performing X-rays. Because patient information and billings are done on computers, potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and similar cumulative trauma injuries that can be addressed through ergonomically designed workstations. If employees travel to patients’ residences there should be monitoring procedures in place that include emergency backup.

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